Hello,

I hope you all are well. I’m finally getting back into a good working groove again for my art projects and my novel, which reminded me about how much I miss blogging about my progress/research.

Starting with the progress with my novel series, what really helped was using a cork board and sticky notes to jot out the main plot. My first draft was written with more of a pantser mentality. I kept beating myself up for it before, but now that I’ve accepted that I’m at where I’m at and there’s no changing that, I can lean more into my plotter side.

Using a cork board and sticky notes to track the plot/character arc of one of my protagonists has helped tremendously. I think seeing the story’s progression through one character’s point of view and having more of a visual/tangible mode of seeing my work brought it more to life. Specifically, I was able to pinpoint how many other characters cross the path of this protagonist along with what areas and events they come to interact with whether they expect it or not. It’s an interesting process because initially I was down on myself for not plotting more for my first draft, but it was pointless to think that way. I’m learning to trust my creative process more and I’ve accepted how chaotic it is, but it’s also has a natural order to it. In other words, there’s an order to my chaos and I should never have compared myself to other authors/writers to begin with. It does help to learn about the creative process of others, but at the end of the day, just do your own thing.

As for the Russian/Slavic witchcraft venture, I previously posted of a podcast I listen to where author Natasha Helvin describes her own experiences. I’ve been reading both of her books Russian Black Magic and Slavic Witchcraft. Both are intriguing reads and are very inspiring for a specific character of my novel, which I hope I can capture well with the utmost respect of the craft.

Here’s the Instagram of one fellow writer I follow who reminded me of cork board plotting.

Now, for my art projects. I focused on my poetry collection for most of the winter season. While working, I kept having these visual ideas being paired with my poems. I’ve done photography with poetry before when I was younger (like a teenager), but looking back on my creations in the past, it’s not really up to my standard of quality today, although I love that I tried my best back then. So what’s the next level? Photomanipulation. I’ve been taking lessons with photoshop, photography, and digital art to see if I can bring my dark fantasy vision and poetry to life through a darker medium. The surrealists and dark self-portraiture artists of the photoshop composite world are amazing.

Danny Bittencourt is a Brazilian visual poet whose work I’ve fallen in love with.

Another is Flóra Borsi, whose fine art self-portraits are surreal and captivating.

I hope to enter this world one day, so I’m working hard. Diving into the world of photoshop and photography was very unexpected while working on my poetry. At first it felt like I was distracting myself from the main goal of the project. Quite the opposite; this is exactly what I’ve been wanting to do since I was a teenager. I don’t want the poetry collection to just be in a book. I want each work to be a masterpiece.

Here’s to ambition and the crazy chaos of creativity.

Be well.

  • Leliel

Featured Image: © Danny Bittencourt

YouTuber TripWhip discusses his own shadow experience and hits the nail on the head with what the shadow truly reveals to you.

Read – “What is Shadow Work? – Metaphysical and Occult Terms 101” to learn more about working with your shadow self.

My shadow has taught me…

…that they never existed in the name of evil or to make the “darkness” seem evil. The shadow is the part of us that’s trying to tell us what we need to be our real selves. It’s a process, but a worthwhile one where you do feel better about revelations about yourself. Shadow work isn’t meant for you to find the “enlightenment” destination, where you understand everything and you’re supposedly just “done” learning about yourself. It’s an ongoing journey that can be taken in gratitude if you humble yourself and listen to your shadow.

Comment below if you have any insights or questions about shadow work.


Metaphysical and Occult Topics

What is Alchemy?

The Ritman’s Library Occult Archive

Getting Started with Tarot

Are You Obsessing Over Your Twin Flame? Stop.


photo of woman carrying a cardboard

No Justice, No Peace – [News/Website Update]

The page that was once “Stand Up – BLM/LGBTQ+” is now No Justice, No Peace, which provides resources, volunteer/donation opportunities, and more regarding the institutional and system prejudices being perpetuated in the USA. The page has been updated to include the Stop Asian Hate movement. I will soon be adding sources regarding how you can […]

The Shadow Self

“…is an archetype that forms part of the unconscious mind and is composed of repressed ideas, instincts, impulses, weaknesses, desires, perversions, and embarrassing fears. This archetype is often described as the darker side of the psyche, representing wildness, chaos, and the unknown.” – Loner Wolf

The shadow is an archetype formed in the unconscious or subconscious coined by clinical psychologist and mystic Carl G. Jung. Working with your shadow requires confronting and embracing repressed feelings. Confronting one’s shadow can be done through divination, meditation, creative projects, journaling, therapy/counseling, and many other ways. If you find that you’re able to honestly express yourself through writing and journaling, you will love the Shadow Work Journal on Loner Wolf, a spiritual mentorship site run by Mateo Sol and Aletheia Luna. This year, I’ve decided to combine divination techniques with their shadow journaling prompts and have found it to be a very thoughtful collection of prompts that help you address what needs confronting and what self-care needs require more attention. My previous shadow work sessions focused on confrontation and I rarely gave myself self-care time. I wanted to give the journal a try because I was very impressed by Loner Wolf’s breakdown of the shadow self and all its potential.

So What’s The Point?

The point of shadow work is to work on the part of yourself that you have labeled as “evil” or “shameful” and instead of turning away from it, you see the shadow for what it is, starting with the fact that you are the shadow. Rejecting any part of yourself often develops into subconscious defense mechanisms, losing your sense of self, robbing yourself of autonomy, and even losing touch with reality. Psychologically, the repression of an aspect of the self creates a dissonance between one’s personal reality and reality as it is. It’s nothing to be ashamed of. Repression in itself is a defense mechanism and defending ourselves is innate. However, defense mechanisms can build into unhealthy and unwanted habits.

Those of us who need to work with our shadow see ourselves pushing our loved ones away, having trouble connecting with others, struggling to see ourselves in a realistic light, believing negative and inaccurate perceptions without challenging them, hurting ourselves and others more than we meant to… the list goes on. The point of shadow work is to take that step towards understanding ourselves. Additionally, don’t believe that this is just for the “spiritual” person. The aspects of shadow work has appeared through works of art, philosophical discussions, scientific studies on humanity, and even in our particular day-to-day events where we have these epiphanies about ourselves. Shadow work in itself is a reflective process and I strongly recommend reading Loner Wolf’s article on the Shadow Self and take that step towards self-actualization.


More on Metaphysics, Occult, and Spirituality

The Backwards Law and The Wheel of Fortune

6 Ways To Cleanse and Empower Yourself

Synchronicity Numbers – 11:11 and More

3 Questions You Should Ask While Researching The Occult


Slavic Witchcraft ft. Natasha Helvin [Research/Video]

Doing some research on Russian and Slavic witchcraft led me to this wonderful and informative podcast by Magick and Mediums. Just wanted to share and hope you enjoy. Also, I’m currently reading Natasha Helvin’s two books Slavic Witchcraft and Russian Black Magic.

So I’m working on another/essay about the history of divination, its structure, and how it became stigmatized. I’ve been wanting to research this for a while because I have been scrutinized by the stigma by those who value science and those who value their religious practice. The motive to research isn’t necessarily to “prove” anything, but to understand how we comprehend something as having power and influence over our lives versus embracing what power we have over our own lives and the lives of others because it’s considered either “blasphemy” to embrace the power of god or just delusional; and yet, humanity’s use of symbolism to process the explainable and unexplainable things in life has been constant for so long.

When I started hunting for resources for my work, I was a bit underwhelmed. It was interesting to review how diviners were once revered advisors to rulers in the past. To this day, we still have people we call mystics, prophets, or readers who are depended on to interpret “the will of god” or the energy of the times. As someone who’s a mystic, I’m already aware of this and also aware of the more popular types of divination, and why divination is bastardized by those who value the scientific method and the domineering religious beliefs in specific areas of the world. All the research I found covered what I already knew so I’m hoping to actually breakdown the standard techniques of divination, the significance of symbolism, and how symbols/omens from divination practices may have made some symbols universal (one example being how we look at the four natural elements metaphorically).

It’s going to take some time, but I thoroughly enjoy it. A while ago, I was also researching past life regression and reincarnation. I still hope to write about that, but understanding of the language of symbolism is required because past life regression is often tapped in to through meditative or divinatory means. One step at a time.

I hope you guys have a great weekend.

Following the “3 Questions You Should Ask While Researching The Occult” advice, I have come across the highly recommended book The Path of Alchemy (2006) by Mark Stavish. I’ve been reading it for a couple of weeks and find it very intriguing! Let me give you the who, when, and why.

Mark Stavish is well known as the Director of Studies for the Institute for Hermetic Studies and over 35 years of Traditional Western Esotericism making him a leading authority in Hermeticism today. You can read more about his academic and publishing history here, but I’m sure his reputation proceeds him for those who have already delved into the Hermetic Qabalah teachings. Some of his books, including The Path of Alchemy were published in the early 2000s, but he’s published many articles and is running a current blog here. As for the why, I think it’s pretty clear Stavish is dedicated to the occult sciences. After reading his interviews, he seems pretty down to earth as someone who acknowledges and is respectful of the different paths one can take to pursue magic, yet stands his ground as to why Hermeticism is essential to his life path.

My Take on The Path of Alchemy

I truly appreciate the informative tone of this book. I don’t know if you’ve experienced the dissatisfying ceremonial or hermetic magicians who are arrogant or publish books that are more fluff than education, but I’m sure over it. I take avid notes while reading The Path of Alchemy, constantly looking forward to dive deeper in this practice. Although most of my own magical practice has been folk/pagan based, I respect the scientific and philosophical background of alchemy Stavish has presented so well.

There isn’t any pretentious bias from what I’ve read so far. It’s not purely instructional either. If you respect the study of astrology and the study of the Qabalah teachings in Hermeticism (which is different than the Jewish Kabbalah or Jewish Mysticism), you’ll grasp the teachings from Stavish quickly. Astrologically, a lot I have read so far just clicked. Hopefully when I finish, I can do a full book review, but for now, I really like it.

If you’ve read this text already and have more you recommend, comment below. Let’s chat.

The Guoyu (Discourses of the states) says: “Of old, the gods descended into those whose spirit was focused, who were at once poised and centered, who knew how to ascend and descend and make comparisons, whose saintliness shed its light abroad, whose vision illumined matters, and whose hearing penetrated them. Men of this kind were […]

Wu ☩ Xi: Cultivated Shamans as Magoi — Occultosophia.

Shared from Occultosophia.

The Ritman Library is a masterpiece holding over 25,000 occult texts in its library and now most of those texts are open to the public. Thanks to The Hermetically Open Project initiated by Esther Ritman, founder Joost R. Ritman, and underwritten by Dan Brown, the author of Angles and Demons, The Da Vinci Code, Inferno, and other titles, we have some awesome reading to do.

The texts can be found on Embassy of the Free Mind’s site. Enjoy! I know I will…

A while ago I wrote the article “Six Uncommon Magical Symbols“, but there’s more to Chnoubis than I realized. If you take a chance to read my article, it’s a short list of mystical symbols and a brief description of their meanings and associations.

According to SymbolDictionary.net, Chnoubis is: “an Egyptian Gnostic solar icon, found most often on gnostic gems, and amulets for protection against poison and disease. It is a composite figure with the head of a lion and the body of a serpent, usually with seven rays emanating from the head, sometimes, with the twelve zodiacal signs. Chnoubis is an aspect of the Gnostic Demiurge, Yaldabaoth, and is associated with Abraxas. Images of Chnoubis are most often found inscribed on gnostic gems, small talismans made from semi-precious stone, that date from the first century onward,” (2012).

In my article, I missed key points about this being an Egyptian Gnostic icon and not really a Christian one, which I’ll have fixed in the article soon. I thought Chnoubis may have come from Christian or at least Judeo-Christian belief due to the icon being associated with Yaldabaoth from “the Apocryphon of John and Pistis Sophia and the Gospel of Judas” and Abraxas who, although questionable origins with the Greeks and Egyptians, has been linked to Christianity as well and is known to have had a place in heaven before he fell.

But what’s more interesting about this symbol is the concept of the demiurge. As I said in my article, “serpents were a sign of healing and enlightenment and are often demonized because of their link to Christian mythology’s interpretation of the devil,” (Authentikei 2019). The serpent having the head of a lion can be up to so many interpretations, but the common terms that pop up are “knowledge”, “poison”, and “protection”, which is why we’ll often run into the Judeo-Christian stories about El or Yahweh creating the universe and scolding Adam and Eve. However, we should turn back to Gnosticism regarding this symbol because the Chnoubis being connected to Yaldabaoth from the Apocryphon recognizes this being as an angel and a chaotic creator. Naturally we’ll think of Satan in the Garden of Eden, which I also mentioned. So is Yaldabaoth Yahweh, Satan, both, or neither? Whichever it is, the description of this demiurge only scratches the surface of the underlying meaning of the Chnoubis.

From Gnostic Warrior:

“The important thing to remember with the story of Yaldabaoth is that it (he and she) is an artificially created life form said to be a lion-faced serpent, with its eyes were like lightning fires which flash that was on a throne surrounded by a blood and no one of the immortal ones could see it. He becomes the Archon (Ark-ON or Spark-On) of the human race. The word archon is composed of the words Ark and On. Ark meaning a conduit of energy that is the Hu-Man sacred ark, or ark of the testimony, represents the original spark of divinity and knowledge that gave us Sophia or wisdom.”

Gnostic Warrior – Yaldabaoth

I’m not going to write out a whole research paper here, but I just think it’s interesting that this symbol in particular has more to do with life, death, and rebirth (which is how I describe Abraxas) more than anything else. It’s not just a symbol of healing and enlightenment. It’s linked to creation and destruction, a power we often consider belonging to just the divine, but a power we exercise daily. That’s healing and enlightening in itself, I feel. And funny enough, the “archon” or “spark” is a very important concept in my novel. I love how everything comes together. #Synchronicity

If you know more about this symbol or the other symbols in my article, please comment.