Second Draft Drama (With Questionnaire)

For my “fantasy” side of my dark fantasy novel series, I created a World Immersion checklist for myself to make sure I have continuity from chapter to chapter. Here’s how it goes:

  • Setting descriptions
  • Lore Continuity
  • Magic System Rule Review
  • Character Placement
  • Character Dialogue/Dialect Accuracy
  • Story Flow

Not bad right? I think that’ll be solid enough. I also created a review questionnaire for myself to reflect on how I’m doing as a writer. Here are my answers for the prologue:

Jeremiad: “A prophecy that evildoing will bring on destruction; a lament. The term is an allusion to the Old Testament prophet Jeremiah, who wrote both kinds of works,” – The NTC’s Dictionary of Literary Terms

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My Take on a Jeremiad

So angst + prophetic vision + telling the vision to everyone while being angsty = a jeremiad. Lol okay maybe it’s more than that. A jeremiad in literature is a work of prose that is sorrowful and prophetic. It has also been used as a plot device.

The power of prophecy is significant in storytelling, especially stories of adventure, mythology, legends, etc. Fantasy and even some horror stories use jeremiads the most, it seems. It can be exposition or be part of some rising or falling action. In yesterday’s post, I discussed Dan Harmon’s Story Circle and I think a jeremiad could work as an element of order or chaos. What if the protagonist’s desire is to prevent the jeremiad from becoming true? What if they are a crucial part of the prophecy? Are they the cause of the impending doom or are they the stopper of doom? A jeremiad has been used to the point of being a bit cliché, but I’m still planning to use it in my novel. I have a prophecy in mind and it gives my protagonist the “chosen one” ambience, but prophecy is often as influential and as powerful as those who truly believe in it and that’s what I want to test with my characters. However, there are also things in life we can’t control even when we’re forewarned about it. I guess a jeremiad can bring our characters to surrender or undying resilience, as plot devices should beckon some kind of great change in our characters…but what do you think? Is a jeremiad and the use of prophecy that constrained? Is it dying out in fiction since we live in a postmodernist age? Comment below.

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What I’m going to discuss is nothing new to fantasy writers. I’m just expressing my excitement. I discovered a more analytical way to explain the magic system of my world without infodumping. Because if you’re going to be a hunter of mages and witches, you better know your s**t. Although my hunters fight fire with fire (literally and figuratively), I don’t want the combat scenes to be the only way my audience sees magic in action. As someone who performs witchcraft, I know there’s so much more to magic than fighting, healing, cursing, banishing, empowering, and the like. There’s a way you should study magic where you do your best to understand its limitations and potential when it flows through yourself and others or else things backfire and get messy. I think the best magicians in history and now are the ones who developed a sort of classification for types of magic that are not just informative, but also personal while avoiding permanence. There should be a balance or correspondence like the hermetic teachings emphasize. I don’t believe all magical techniques are meant to be uniform because sometimes magic is just an experiential whirlwind, but there’s something really tantalizing and sexy about analytical breakdowns for the sake of efficiency.

Or maybe my sapiosexual, Aquarian energy gives me weird kinks. I don’t know. Don’t judge me.

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(Featured Image Source: I couldn’t find the name of the original artist. If you know, please tell me in the comments. Thanks.)

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