What is a daemon or demon? – Metaphysical and Occult Terms 101

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Demon/Daemon/Daimon: “Lesser spirit or god. A devil in Christian mythology. Literal meaning for Demon – “Replete with wisdom.” Derived from the Greek ‘daimon’ meaning divine power” – S. Connolly (1997-2006) – The Complete Book of Demonolatry.

The Stoic understanding of daemon is not so different from the Socratic understanding of the daimonion, or the divine sign which was responsible for keeping Socrates out of politics and instead passionate about a life seeking wisdom. A faculty of divine rationality.

Equanimous Rex (2017) – Socrates’ Daemon and Ancient Oracles: The Mysterious Byways of Reason – modernmythology.net

According to Occult World, daemons or daimons are mentioned as far back as Ancient Greece and were considered divine beings intuitively communicating between humanity and the gods or the divine. They can be good or they can be evil (according to most demonologists, but not all. Opinions vary on whether some demons/daemons are completely good or completely evil). When Christianity evolved, most pagan deities were labeled as demons, or the fallen angels that rebelled against the Christian god, Jehovah. Daemons or demons are associated with possession, but that can be paralleled with the Jungian perspective claiming daemons can communicate or become the higher self.

There are various books on demonolatry, demonology, and demons themselves. A few are:

  • The Encyclopedia of Demons and Demonology by Rosemary Ellen Guiley
  • The Complete Book of Demonolatry by S. Connolly
  • Dictionnaire Infernal by Collin de Plancy
  • The Goetia: The Lesser Key of Solomon by Aleister Crowley
  • Psuedomonarchia Daemonum by Johann Weyer

If you’re a budding occultist or mystic, please be sure you’re thoughtful, well informed, and properly taught before engaging with any of the entities mentioned in the above texts or other books/grimoires.

One thought on “What is a daemon or demon? – Metaphysical and Occult Terms 101

  1. Interesting enough, when Christian nations would subjugate new territories they would also liken the more popular deities of that cultures to be similar to Saints of Christianity so the conversation process was easier. I know it happened a lot during the colonial period.

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