My Twin Flame Article Broke 10,000 reads on vocal.media!

My article “Quit Obsessing Over Your Twin Flame” has gained a lot of attention on my vocal.media platform and I’m so very grateful. Twin flames are a tricky subject in the metaphysical/new age community. We always wonder if we’re ever going to meet them, if we only have one, how can we manifest it faster, or what to do when your twin flame doesn’t know you exist or even care.

A twin flame is a little different than a soulmate. A twin flame is like your living mirror who has their own life and being around them or even thinking about them can be intense. Recognizing your twin flame isn’t really for the sake of having a beautiful romantic reunion (and for the record, NOT all twin flames are romantic), but more for each flame’s self-enlightenment.

Please read if the topic interests you. It’s a bit trippy, but I hope anyone on their twin flame journey will get a better idea on how to handle what they’re going through. I’m heading into my sixth year with mine and my twin flame doesn’t even know I exist. The twin flame journey will also be discussed in my novel series, but I’ll expand on that another time.

Also, I’d like to give a quick shout out to vocal.media, which is an excellent platform for writers who want to make some earnings for writing what they love.

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Music On The Way – “Love’s A Burden” by Beyond The Black – How I Did Cover Songs In The Past

Beyond The Black is a german symphonic metal band that I really like. I don’t have a badass metal band at the moment, so I’m going to do my own take on “Love’s A Burden” with sort of a gothic electronica twist, since it is one of the few songs that isn’t heavy and I don’t have to feel too pressured.

Follow me on Instagram for more updates on my progress.

How I Did Cover Songs In The Past

So, in 2014, I actually had a channel called “Keiko Artz” where I would do cover songs (mostly anime intros, songs from movies, or songs from video games lol). When I nearly lost my battle with clinical depression in 2016, I deleted the channel and all my old songs off of YouTube and removed it from stores (well some songs might be up somewhere lol). The songs are still saved on my computer and there are some I would like to share again, but I’ll need to record them over. But when I had them up, I had them accompanied with (very amateur-ish) digital art. I was still learning how to draw then and it was incredibly difficult to have enough confidence in myself to complete a work and keep it up there. Well, three years later, I’m back into drawing again and I’m determined to keep creating. So, if you stay in touch, I hope you’ll support me. Like I said before, on Instagram I show my progress. The final result will be on my YouTube Channel and on my blog of course :).

Wonder and delight: Tolkien and Pagan ideas — Dowsing for Divinity

JRR Tolkien loved ancient Pagan mythology, especially Norse mythology. He also loved trees, flowers, rivers and streams, mountains, woods, and landscape generally. His writing is infused with a love of Nature, as well as an in-depth knowledge of ancient cultures and mythologies. He was, however, a Catholic, both by upbringing and conviction. He wrote his […]

Wonder and delight: Tolkien and Pagan ideas — Dowsing for Divinity

This is an EXCELLENT read if you’re a Tolkien fan.

What Does Pastoral Mean? – Literary Terms 101

Pastoral: “A poem having to do with shepherds and rural life; from pastor, the Latin word for shepherd…The three forms are (1) the singing match between two shepherds, sometimes called the eclogue, (2) the monologue of a single lovesick shepherd lamenting his mistress’s aloofness; and (3) the elegy, or dirge, for a dead friend,” (Morner and Rausch, 1991) – The NTC’s Dictionary of Literary Terms.

My Take on Pastoral Work/Poetry

I see rural or rustic life as having a mixture of peaceful simplicity and complex melancholy. As a southern Colorado person, I find the wide open space and absence of urban life to have a calm to it, but my mind has transformed that calm into a type of sadness. I really relate to pastoral works, especially elegies. If you think about rural life, small farm towns where everybody knows everybody, the passing of someone or the breaking off of a relationship is often devastating. You have very few activities to distract you and even more responsibilities to attend to if you don’t have some of the conveniences city life can offer. But no matter where you live, loss happens. John Milton’s Lycidas is a well-known example of a pastoral elegy. Milton had so much anxiety about his life accomplishments and his mortality. Milton wrote many elegies, so existence and death must’ve been at the forefront of his brain. Through Lycidas, I want to argue that he did a kind of self-talk to face his grief over his college friend, Edward King; Apollo, St. Peter, and the Muses appear and seem to help him confront the shepherding lifestyle that reminded Milton of his friend, but guided him from a place of despair to hope and inner peace.

Weep no more, woeful shepherds, weep no more, 
For Lycidas, your sorrow, is not dead, 
Sunk though he be beneath the wat’ry floor; 
So sinks the day-star in the ocean bed, 
And yet anon repairs his drooping head, 
And tricks his beams, and with new spangled ore 
Flames in the forehead of the morning sky: 
So Lycidas sunk low, but mounted high

Lycidas Lines 165-172

It’s kind of interesting that Milton, who grew up in a bourgeois family and lifestyle, wanted to use pastoral themes to honor Edward. I know it was the 17th century so what they considered “urban” or city life isn’t how we see it today and I’m probably overthinking it (lol). Some analyses of Lycidas consider Milton using pastoral poetry to metaphorically call out the Church of England clergymen, which is more likely. So am I taking pastoral works too literally? Even Virgil’s pastoral work is described as, “…a poetic genre in which the author could use humble characters to talk about public figures and current affairs. Because shepherds are the poet-musicians of the countryside,” (Poetry Foundation) but his pastoral poetry is also “…not just a literary construct, inasmuch as there are striking touches of realism in the descriptions of country life,” (Poetry Foundation). So there is something about the countryside that encourages deep contemplation! But Virgil became a rich boy too with humble beginnings. I guess I find it interesting as to how the wide open spaces of the countryside can inspire so much existentialism.

Anyway, there are many other good pastoral works out there (Shelley’s Adonais is recommended as well). I think the most important quality of this genre is the act of contemplating life whether that leads to existential dread or a kind of revelation. I wonder if pastorals influenced Westerns and other storytelling mediums about country life. I also want to add that even though I chose an example that focused on death and grief, not all pastorals are so morbid. There’s a beauty and charm in pastoral simplicity as well, such as finding love and simply loving. The point is that the pastoral piece itself addresses elements of rural life emphasizing its influence or symbolic meaning on life events, similar to an idyll.

Let me know what you thought of this. Have you tried writing pastoral poems before? How would you write one if you’re a city slicker or have you ventured the countryside before? I’d love to hear from you.

A Creative Spirit and Mystic – Understanding My Blog’s Niche

My greatest challenge lately has been balancing emotion with logic and when it comes to creating anything, I always feel a bit out of balance. I’ll overthink the way I wrote something or sang something, then a split second later I hate it because what I created doesn’t feel right. I’ve been weighing the balance while creating content on this blog. All I’ve figured out so far is that I don’t want to be boxed in. I want, well, need to connect with others and for that to happen, I need to be transparent, vulnerable, and, as my artist name suggests, authentic.

So, I’ve decided I’m going to gradually exhibit more transparency. I want my blog/Instagram to be in the realm of “lifestyle” when it comes to my spiritual ventures, pagan philosophy, metaphysical wonderings, and the like, but I’m also someone who enjoys advising others and providing information, especially about writing. Being a freelance editor for about two years showed me how much I love helping people sharpen their work and have a better understanding of who they are, so I need to do the same for myself.

My content niche is artistry combined with spirituality. They have never been separated and, frankly, have never been categorized and I think that’s because there’s something about being a creative spirit where freedom is mandatory. If I box myself in, I’ll die. Call it melodramatic, but I can’t emphasize how much it sucks when I go into full-blown panic attacks over thinking about the hypothetical life of having a “steady” job, working from 9-5, eating shitty food because my job doesn’t give me enough time to have a decent meal, rushing to satisfy another person’s schedule, going to bed feeling empty because my job is emotionally unfulfilling, then waking up and doing that all over again. Other’s thrive in the steadiness of a job like that and that’s fine. It’s just not me. So perhaps the purpose of this blog and its content isn’t just to share my lifestyle with others and connect with those who follow the same path, but it’s also to help me take a deep breath and remember that following my intuition in the grand scheme of my overall wellness.

So, that’s who I am and that’s what my little sole-proprietor business shall be. It’s just me: a creative spirit and mystic.

(If anyone knows the original artist of the featured photo, please comment below so I can credit them. Thank you 🙂 )

Website theme changed.

Just a heads up, I changed the website layout on my blog. Hope it works for you guys. ^_^

What is Hamartia? Literary Terms 101

Hamartia: “The error, misstep, frailty, or flaw that causes the downfall of a tragic hero. Sometimes called the tragic flaw… bad judgment, ignorance, accident, inherited weakness, or plain bad luck…Whatever the error or defect, it results in action (or inaction) that leads to disaster. – NTC’s Dictionary of Literary Terms by Kathleen Morner and Ralph Rausch (1991).

I strongly recommend getting this dictionary if you’re a fiction writer.

My Take on Hamartia In Writing

Hamartia must appear in every story, if you think about. It’s necessary conflict (internal and external). How else is your character going to develop if they don’t endure some sort of issue that is placed upon them or self-perpetuated? Many authors understood that any type of tragedy or disaster makes audiences feel pity, fear, or satisfaction for the character(s) affected by it. One example off the top of my head is (vague Game of Thrones spoilers ahead!!) is Hodor who just…had to hold that damn door and shatter my heart into a million pieces.

I’ve seen tragedy hit the whole spectrum of archetypes, even though this definition focuses solely on the tragic hero since the Greek Classics have most protagonists fail due to their prideful nature. It has to happen because that’s what makes a plot work; that’s what makes characters relatable. Audiences want to see the character confront disaster, whether they survive it or not because it echoes reality, you succeed or you fail. However, tragedy is not that black and white. Some rise from the ashes of their suffering and some don’t, but transformation is inevitable. Even when a villain faces disaster in death, and I mean a well-crafted villain with backstory, motive, and ambition, you see them as more than just the bad guy who got what they deserved. If anything, it should poke at the audience’s moral compass encouraging them to question their ethical boundaries (because pitying a villain is strange to some and accepted by others).

Additionally, adding a little metaphysical take on this, the act of manifesting or weaving your own destiny is common in stories and hamartia plays in the mix of that. Most of us prefer calling it “reaping what you sow”, but in the metaphysical community, we call that “The Dark Night of the Soul“, where you’re in a place of complete sacrifice or surrender and come to terms with whether you’ll endure what’s happening to you by trusting yourself to survive it or choose to despair and desperately mourn that you didn’t reach your ego-based expectations. I don’t think hamartia is enticing if it becomes the definite annihilation of the character where they’re damned for eternity for their purposeful or accidental sin and that’s it. A choice must be made. Hamartia exudes its greatest effect as an inevitable, destructive force that shows no bias to any archetype and shouldn’t be considered “evil” or “just”, “bad” or “good”, but simply destined to appear before you and demand you make a choice, which can be taking action or being inactive.

I’ll be sharing more literary terms in the future, but seriously, get the dictionary of literary terms. Maybe I’m being a lit nerd and pushing too hard, but it’s just…fun to read. Especially if you like learning random new things.